The Boston Marathon 2012

April 17, 2012
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The great Boston Marathon has come and gone, once again.

Once again, tens of thousands made the 26.2 mile route, and this time, in the searing heat of a spring that came very early.

Safety warnings not withstanding from public officials and race officials, as well, the legion of runners – men, women, and those in wheelchairs – all performed.

Many were bothered by the heat and succumbed to it, but the race went on.

Not since the 2006 Marathon, when the temperature was 83 degrees in Hopkinton when the race started, has the heat been an issue as it was on Monday.

For all the trials and tribulations put upon the race because of Monday’s heat, the Marathon shined, beginning a bit more slowly because of the heat but ending many thousands of times for individuals who strained themselves and took the test – and who made it.

Back Bay was its usual self on Marathon Day – crowded with hundreds of thousands of people, onlookers, runners, support folks.

The Back Bay was again taken over by the Marathon, which is, inarguably, the single biggest event every year of its kind in this neighborhood.

We congratulate each and every finisher.

And we congratulate everyone who took a part in this annual event for helping to make it one of Boston’s signature moments.

The Boston Marathon shows Boston at its best – as it did this year, again.

The mayor and casino gambling

Mayor Thomas Menino has come out strongly in favor of casino gambling. Not only that, he is unambiguous about his belief that a casino at The mayor and casino gambling

Mayor Thomas Menino has come out strongly in favor of casino gambling. Not only that, he is unambiguous about his belief that a casino at Suffolk Downs in East Boston would be of great value to Boston as a tourist and convention destination as well as a sure source of gambling revenues.

“We not only want to bring a casino here, but we want to do it the right way,” he said last week.

Once again, the mayor knows of what he is speaking.

Property tax revenues from a casino located at Suffolk Downs would give the city $15 million a year in property taxes alone.

In addition, thousands of jobs would be created and during its building phase, thousands of craftsmen and trades people would be taken from the unemployment lists to build the facility.

The mayor is correct in his understanding that the casino is not panacea, but rather, one more important component of world class city like Boston.

A casino isn’t the end all and be all of Boston. Rather, it is one more entertainment venue and a sure source of major new revenue to the city at a time when Boston is shining as a place to live and to work.

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